Carotte a l’Etuvee (Waterless Cooked Carrots)

I realize carrots aren’t quite as exciting as Sole Veronique or Tournedos Rossini, however, carrots can make a fabulous entree, such as the post of Carrot Ginger Soup, or it can make a delicious side dish.

I adore roasted carrots with a mix of sweet potatoes, butternut squash and parsnips.  But this time of year I like to keep my carrots simple and fresh, just like the season.  The perfect method of cooking carrots simply is the classic French version, Carottes a’ l’Etuvee, waterless cooked carrots.  This method uses the carrots own moisture to gently cook them.  What you end up with are vibrant orange carrots that are intensely sweet and ever so crisp tender.

There are also a few simple variations for this carrot recipe.  Add a little fresh chopped ginger to the carrots while cooking, or at the end of cooking, toss the carrots with a splash of brandy.  The Bennett Crew’s favorite… simply a good dose of our favorite dairy product… butter.

Bon Appetit!

Ingredients                                                                                            

2 lbs carrots, sliced

2 tablespoons butter

1 sprig fresh thyme

Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions

In a saucepan over low heat, add the carrots and then top with the butter.  Cover with a tight fitting lid.

The carrots will begin to steam in their own moisture.  After about 10 minutes check the carrots to be sure they are steaming.  If not increase the heat to medium low.  If you have several layers of carrots in your saucepan it should take about 20 minutes to cook to crisp tender.  If you have a larger pan, your cooking time will be decreased.  Cook the carrots longer if you like them more tender.

Once the carrots are done, remove the lid and let the steam and water evaporate, leaving only the butter at the bottom of the pan.  Sprinkle with a little salt and pepper and toss in the butter.  Sprinkle with fresh chopped thyme or parsley and serve immediately.

I like to serve these carrots with Roasted Whole Chicken (under chicken in this blog), or a smoked ham.  And of course we love these carrots with our Thanksgiving turkey dinner.

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